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What additional information do I need to install my equipment that is not in HWU

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This KB article provides information you need when preparing your site for installation, that may not be available in the Hardware Universe (HWU) portal.

Site information and necessary installation tools:
Environment requirements for your equipment:

When selecting a location to set up your system, you must ensure that it meets the following general environmental characteristics:

  • The site is free of dust and dirt.
  • There is sufficient room around your system for access to the components and for proper airflow around the system.
  • The site meets temperature and humidity requirements for the system.
  • The site meets the electrical requirements for your equipment.
Ambient temperature and fan speed considerations:

NetApp systems have variable speed cooling fans. At higher ambient temperatures, the fans will spin faster and consume more power. This may counteract some energy savings anticipated by raising the ambient temperature.
You should operate your system within the NetApp-defined operating temperature range, as defined in the HWU. As the temperature increases, the reliability and life expectancy of electronics and hard disk drives decreases.
Any changes in the site environment that are caused by unforeseen circumstances due to disaster occurrence or prevention would create an environment that is not suitable for system operation and would impact warranty obligations. These conditions could include, but are not limited to flooding, fire, fire suppressant, or other extinguishing systems. 

Required tools and equipment:

Prior to receiving your hardware, make sure that you have the appropriate tools and equipment assembled and ready to use:

  • Pallet jack, forklift, hand truck or other mechanized lift, depending on what you receive
  • #1 and #2 Phillips head screwdrivers and a flathead screwdriver for cable adapters
  • A host or client that can attach to a serial console port
  • Null modem cable (optional)
If a mechanized lift is not available, multiple people may be required to install certain NetApp products. Consult the installation documentation or HWU for specific weight and lifting considerations.
 
Additional required tools for DC power connections:

If you ordered a DC power version of your product, you may require the following items to fabricate the three-way cables required for DC power connections:

  • Wire-stripper
  • Soldering tool and pliers
  • 12 AWG to 6 AWG x 3 copper wire (length determined by environment)
  • 3/16'' flathead screwdriver

For details about your DC power supply, see the DC power supply documentation that came with your DC power supply. You can also find this documentation on the NetApp Support site.
Attention: Do not mix different AC with DC power supplies in your controller. 

Converting watts to volt-amps (VA):

Use the following formula to calculate VA from watts with measurements made in the Hardware Universe (HWU):
 
VA = Watts/PF
PF = 0.95
Watts = Watts listed in the individual tables in the HWU
 

System connectivity information:
Types of connectivity:

Your system requires the following types of connections:

  • Fibre Channel—Connects your controller to disk shelves, Fibre Channel switches, ATTO FibreBridges, tape backup devices, and to other storage devices. They can connect through the following media:
    • Copper
    • Optical fiber
  • SAS—Connects your appliance to SAS disk shelves and other SAS-based equipment. They can connect through the following media:
    • Copper cable with Mini-SAS HD connectors
    • Copper cable with QSFP connectors
    • Optical fiber SAS cable
  • Ethernet—Connects your controller to an Ethernet network through the following media:
    • Copper
    • Optical fiber

Additional cable information is available in the HWU and the NetApp Support site.

Fibre Channel connectivity

Your controller connects to disk shelves, Fibre Channel switches, ATTO FibreBridges, tape backup devices, and other storage through onboard ports or adapter ports. See the HWU for an example of typical connectors used to connect Fibre Channel devices.
 
The following table lists maximum distances supported by 50 micron multimode fiber optic cables, with LC or SC connectors, connected to dual-port or quad-port Fibre Channel Host Bust Adapters (HBA), Unified Target Adapters (UTA) or ATTO FibreBridges:
 

Wavelength (nm)

Core size
(microns)

Modal Bandwidth
(MHz/km)

Distance
(Meters)

Card
(speed)

850

50

500 (OM2)

500

1 Gb/s

300

2 Gb/s

150

4 Gb/s

50

8 Gb/s

35

16 Gb/s

2000 (OM3)

860

1 Gb/s

500

2 Gb/s

380

4 Gb/s

150

8 Gb/s

100

16 Gb/s

4700 (OM4) 400 4 Gb/s
190 8 Gb/s
125 16 Gb/s

 

SAS connectivity:
Your controller connects to SAS disk shelves and other SAS-based devices through SAS host bus adapters (HBAs) or onboard ports. See the HWU for specific examples of SAS HBAs.
 
Ethernet connectivity:
Your controller connects to an Ethernet network through either Ethernet/UTA onboard ports, Ethernet network interface cards (NICs) or Unified Target Adapters (UTA) that support either copper or fiber cabling.
 
Copper GbE cabling and NICs:
The cabling and network requirements for GbE and 10GbE networks using copper cabling are:
Types: Single-port, dual-port, quad-port Connector type: RJ-45 for all
Cable type: Category 5, 5E, 6  or 6a unshielded four-pair cable for 10/100-T/100BASE-T/1000BASE-T/10GBASE-T
Maximum distance: 100m
Note: Category 6a cables are required to reach the full 100m distance for 10GBASE-T.
 
Optical fiber Ethernet cabling and NICs:
The following cabling and network requirements are for 10GbE/40GbE networks using optical cabling.
 
The following table lists maximum distances supported by 50 micron multimode fiber optical cables, with LC or MPO connectors for Ethernet NICs or UTAs:

Wavelength
(nm)
MMF

Core size
(microns)

Modal
Bandwidth
(MHz/km)

Distance
(Meters)

Speed

850

50

2,000 (OM3)

300

10 GbE
100 40 GbE

4,700 (OM4)

400

10 GbE
125 40 GbE

 

Circuit breaker and power outlet balancing:
About the requirements:

NEMA: If your equipment is mounted in a rack, the total number of circuit breakers required for your equipment is based on the current draw. You should not load a circuit beyond 80 percent of the rated limit for the circuit.
For example, if you have a 20A circuit, you should load it to no more than 16A of draw.
 
IEC: If your equipment is mounted in a rack, the total number of circuit breakers required for your equipment is based on the current draw.
For example, if you have a 16A circuit, you should load it to no more than 16A of draw. 
Attention: Overloading circuit breakers can lead to tripped breakers or power brownouts that can cause system errors. 

Balancing the load across PDUs:

A best practice is to plan how to distribute the total load across the PDU banks prior to plugging your system components into them. You should make each bank load as equally as possible (applicable to 3-phase PDUs).
 
Keep the following considerations in mind when planning to balance the load:

  • Balancing the load depends on the number of components being connected and the location of the component power supply units (PSUs), as shown in the following illustrations.
  • You should connect the components to different PDUs on opposite sides of the system cabinet, using the illustrations for reference.
  • You should plug each component into the PDU outlet directly across from the component, using the illustrations for reference.
Examples of balancing the load with a single component:

The following illustrations show three examples of connecting the PSUs of a single component, such as a controller in a single chassis, to the system cabinet PDUs.

PSUs on opposite sides of the component:
PSUs_on_opposite_sides_of_the_component-pg11.png

PSUs on the same side of the component:

PSUs_on_the_same_side_of_the_component-pg11.png
 

PSUs stacked on the same side of the component:
PSUs_stacked_on_the_same_side_of_the_component-pg11.png

1

PSU 1

2

Left PDU outlet

3

PSU 2

4

Right PDU outlet

 
Examples of balancing the load with two components:      

The following illustrations show three examples of connecting the PSUs of two components, such as a component with two controller modules in a single chassis or two components close together, to the system cabinet PDUs.

 

PSUs on opposite sides of the component:

PSUs_on_opposite_sides-pg12.png

PSUs on the same side of the component:

PSUs_on_the_same_side_of_the_component-pg12.png

PSUs stacked on the same side of the component:

PSUs_stacked_on_the_same_side_of_the_component-pg12.png

1

Left PDU, bank A

2

Left PDU, bank B

3

Right PDU, bank A

4

Right PDU, bank B

5

PSU 1, component 1

6

Left PDU, bank A outlet

7

PSU 2, component 1

8

Right PDU, bank A outlet

9

PSU 1, component 2

10

Left PDU, bank B outlet

11

PSU 2, component 2

12

Right PDU, bank B outlet

13

Component 1

14

Component 2

Console pinout requirements:
Console port adapter pinout:

The following table lists the pinout configuration for the RJ-45 to DB-9 dongle shipped with some systems:

RJ-45

Signal

DB-9 (Male connector)

1 [not connected]

 

 

2 [not connected]

 

 

3 (connected to pin 3 on DB-9)

TXD

3 (connected to pin 3 on RJ-45)

4 (connected to pin 5 on DB-9)

GND

5 (connected to pin 4 on RJ-45)

5 [not connected]

 

 

6 (connected to pin 2 on DB-9)

RXD

2 (connected to pin 6 on RJ-45)

7 [not connected]

 

[not connected] 1

8 [not connected] [not connected]

 

 

 

 

[not connected] 6 through 9

 

ASCII terminal console wiring:

The following table lists the RJ-45 connection pinout for ASCII terminal console wiring:

Pin number

Signal

1

Connected to pin 8

2

Not connected

3

TXD (from system)

4

GND

5

GND

6

RXD (to system)

7

Not connected

8

Connected to Pin 1

 

Additional Information

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